12 March 2010

The View from Out Here

Hey, Friends!

So another thing about perspective is that sometimes we need the help of others. The stories I shared Wednesday all involved other people. In each of those cases, it took hearing another opinion to encourage me to look for a different way.

Maybe you change it up because you can't stand routine. Or maybe you find yourself in a rut because what you did before worked. Why risk failure when you already know what will succeed? Or maybe you just can't see another way out.

I feel that for the most part, I'm a very logical person. But I've learned the hard way that what is logical to me makes no sense to others. I'm creatively logical--which means that 2+2=triangle. When I explain my way of thinking, it makes perfect sense. But until then I'm just extremely odd. Which has its own perks. :0)

But I get stuck in the well worn groove of how I think. I don't know to think any other way. That's when an outside perspective can make all of the difference.

Some of my closest friends are very different from me. When I'm stuck seeing the individual tiles of a certain situation, they see the mosaic before them. It's the same subject, just a different way of looking at it. Both are valid. Both are vital. Outside perspectives give the situation dimension that we can't see on our own.

Sometimes it's really hard to hear or read critiques of our work. After all, we poured our souls into it. There's this secret hope that it's brilliant and a secret fear that it's an utter disaster. But if we're able to get over ourselves, our fear, and even our pride, we might see something we didn't know we needed. We might find an answer to a riddle we couldn't solve on our own, or find another way out of a difficult situation--one a reader wouldn't expect that would completely shatter the problem of cliche.

The key is being willing to listen and consider the other viewpoint. Even being willing to try something different--adopting a different perspective.

Have a great weekend! See y'all Monday!

17 comments:

  1. Definitely. There is always a part of me that hopes I'll get stuff back from my critters with a: I got nothing. This is perfect. That has yet to happen and I'm always glad after I do the changes. My critique partners have a knack for pointing out stuff I'm unable to notice and see and my story's always better because of it.

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  2. This helped me on so many levels. Thank you. I've been thinking a lot about how different I am from everyone else I know and feeling kind of alien.
    Karen

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  3. I have a love/hate relationship with critiques. I love the way they help me grow as a writer, but I hate the way I feel defeated sometimes. They are so important though.

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  4. Outside perspective is scary, exhilarating, depressing - but so needed to improve as a writer.

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  5. I like the visual of inviting others in to see the whole mosaic, not just the tiles. If they are safe people, they offer encouragement, not judgement. This builds us up.

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  6. Especially necessary in marriage or with most relationships to consider someone else. Good reminder. :O)

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  7. I love critiques because I always learn from them even though some are hard to take. I hope your weekend is a good one and I hope I catch up soon with you all!

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  8. Excellent point! How else will we grow in our writing and otherwise without input, stretching and testing, and a willingness to listen carefully.
    Happy weekend,
    Karen

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  9. Well-said and so true. Thinking of my husband and the book I've decided to rewrite. :-)

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  10. This is a very painful truth. The scripture comes to mind, iron sharpens iron. We have the unique opportunity to sharpen one another. What a blessing!

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  11. Kristen, this post really helped me and reminded me of a weakness. I am so passionate about things that often I don't stop to really hear what others are saying.

    You rock.
    Patti

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  12. Oh, Kristen, you read my mail with that comment on you secretly hope it's brilliant, but fear it's a disaster. Sending in the Genesis entry left me weak in the knees. I hope I at least get a decent grade.

    Blessings,
    Susan :)

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  13. Humility plays such a huge role in our ability to have good relationships. Well said here.

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  14. Yes! Growth is painful and listening to crits can be painful. I like to read the edits then step away and cool off before I continue. It works like a charm!

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  15. Oh, so good. Thank you for your wisdom.

    It's true: everyone has different logic. We need each other, even if our initial response to "their" thinking is to cry or feel angry.

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  16. If it weren't for my crit partners and their 2x4's, I'd never get anything polished!

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  17. Getting different perspectives, learning to see through others eyes, asking those with viewpoints totally opposite, turned inside out of your own: these are what give life dimension. I traveled with some people back in college who all had drastically different views on life than I do. And I learned so much. I am much more compassionate to those who I would have, before, dismissed without a second thought. Not out of malice, but because I simply didn't understand where they were coming from. It broadens the mind and helps you understand where you can better minister. And sometimes, the best ministry is to just listen and say, "you know what...it's okay you're different from me, I'm different from you. What matters is God loves us and I'm here to love you. That's all."

    Wonderful post!
    Jen

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