22 March 2010

Parking Lot with a View

Hey, Friends! Thanks for your encouragement about Unplug Week. I accomplished a lot of mini-projects, which made me feel really good!

So...

Last Monday I went to work as usual, only it was not a usual day. You see, many of my close friends went to Africa for a week, so driving into work I was all too aware how much I missed them--and how much work I had to do, since I remained behind to "hold down the fort" in our program.

Lunch time came and I needed a pick-me-up. So I drove to Chic-fil-A, ran an errand, and drove back. But there was construction on one road, and I got stuck on a bridge.

Not fun, right?

Oh--wait. I didn't set the scene. Let's try this again.

Lunch time came and I needed a pick-me-up. My new hometown sits around a lake, so there are no "short errand runs". Driving to Chic-fil-A and back almost takes a full hour in itself. So with the windows down and the country music blaring, I drove across town. The sun was so warm (after months of winter, even 56 degrees feels warm!) it tricked me into eating outside, despite the gusting wind.

After a quick run into Walmart, I drove back to the office--only to meet construction on the way. With thirty cars at a stand still before me, I came to a stop on a bridge crossing the lake. The breeze lifted my hair, the cold water danced in the sunlight on either side of me, and my favorite song came on the radio.

Paradise up high in a "parking lot".

Sometimes all we need to do is set the scene. It'll change everything.

How do you set your scenes?

See y'all Wednesday!

24 comments:

  1. Great point! We can take the same elements and create a whole different scene.

    And good way to look at the positive!

    Elizabeth
    Mystery Writing is Murder

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  2. What a fun post!

    How do I set up my scenes? That's a great question? I go for lots of sensory details, but more importantly, I dig deep and try to think how my character responds emotionally to those details.

    Good to see you, Kristen!
    Katie

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  3. I love that Kristen! Scene and perspective make a huge difference!

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  4. Chick-Fil-A - I'm jealous! :) Thanks for setting the scene for us. Hope your lunch was yummy!
    Blessings,
    Karen

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  5. I don't know if traffic is ever a positive but you did a good job of making me think so. :)

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  6. Loved how you changed the scene! Perspective makes such a difference, doesn't it?

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  7. Great example. I find that when I tell stories to people. I rush and don't set the scene. Good reminder.

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  8. Woah, you are one clever chick! I love this post.

    How do I set the scenes? Use as many senses as possible, search for fun words to describe common items, pray.

    Have a great week,
    Jen
    Audience of ONE

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  9. I love it. This is so true. You just proved how important it is to set the scene.

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  10. This is such a great example of "showing" us how important setting a scene can be, rather than "telling" us.
    Karen

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  11. Hi Kristin -

    Writing action and dialogue are my thing, but I have to be mindful of setting. Think of a family show without the backdrop of a living room or kitchen. The actors go through a lot of conflict without any help from their surroundings.

    Your wonderful description helped me "see" where you were and vicariously experience your mood.

    Blessings,
    Susan :)

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  12. Well done, Kristin! The difference in my response as a reader was significant between the drafts. Proof of your gift :)

    and, glad unplug week was helpful...I got a ton written.

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  13. That was a perfect example of what we need to do in our writing! I'm glad your favorite song came on and you were able to enjoy the paradise around you. Really it can be anywhere can't it?

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  14. Great example! I usually do the Ingermanson snowflake thing, then outline scenes as far as where, when, what, who, and why. Then freestyle takes over.

    SO GOOD to have you back! Missed you!!!

    patti

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  15. Oh how I love Chick-fil-A! :)

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  16. Setting the scene is like taking a new perspective for sure. I love it when I can change a situation just by seeing the good side of it!!

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  17. So glad you're enjoying your new job!! Sometimes those times stuck in traffic prove to be amazing prayer times! Totally different perspective! God bless!

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  18. You made me wish I was there with you!

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  19. Fantastic illustration!!

    (I was writing a book for a while with two perspectives...the same event from two different POVs. Very fun exercise in how the bare facts do not really tell the whole truth!)

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  20. Writing and life... so many parallels. Great example, thanks for sharing!

    And I think I'll take a leaf out of your book and when something unpleasant comes along, I'll reset the scene (both in writing and life).

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  21. How beautiful! This makes me want to get stuck in traffic!!!

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  22. Oooo, tricksy! Excellent way to make a point, Kristen. Great lesson. :-)

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  23. woo hoo...love this...your scene two. I'm taking a course now that's helping me to visualize the scenes...On the weekend I spent two hours on one paragraph trying to capture one scene. I wanted the feelings to show...like you did...in this example...thanks Kristin

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  24. Haha! I'd LOVE to be stuck in traffic on a bridge over sparkling water instead of a back road with plowed over trees on one side and a golf course community on the other. Yes, setting makes ALL the difference in the world!

    Jen

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